Douglas Scruggs of Bullard, Texas with his ‘38 Chevy he rebuilt in the 90s. “It was a rust bucket. It was a pile of junk. It was solid rust,” he said.

Scruggs spent two years rebuilding the car using parts from junkyards including pieces from Lincolns, Volkswagens, and a Mercury. Most of the interior is from an ‘88 Grand Am. “Some people spend $25,000 on the interior, but we didn’t do that. I didn’t go to a catalog or a magazine to get my parts, I got them from a wrecking yard.”

He got the idea for the unique paint job from a car he saw in Memphis, Tennessee. He and his wife Betty have put many miles on the hot rod, taking it Kentucky, Mississippi, Missouri and beyond. “I’m not scared to drive it, I’d go to California right now,” he said, “I have boxes and boxes of awards from this thing.”

the latest from my Unique Cars of East Texas project! This is Lawrence and Wanda Harper of Big Sandy, Texas in their 1956 Chevy Bel Air convertible. They purchased it from a seller on e-Bay and picked it up in Lawrenceburg, Indiana. 

"Wanda says it’s a ladies car. She likes to drive it with the top down, and I like to drive it with the top up. My favorite thing about it is the blue top because most convertible tops are black or white. The top is what got my attention, and it gets attention everywhere it goes." -Lawrence 

Boshears student Hayleigh Danielson, 5, takes a break from her wheelchair to cuddle with Therapet dog Murray during class Thursday June 26, 2014 at the school in Tyler. Therapet Animal Assisted Therapy partners with the Wayne D. Boshears Center for Exceptional Programs by bringing its animals to the school and working with the students who have varying special needs. 

Boshears student Hayleigh Danielson, 5, takes a break from her wheelchair to cuddle with Therapet dog Murray during class Thursday June 26, 2014 at the school in Tyler. Therapet Animal Assisted Therapy partners with the Wayne D. Boshears Center for Exceptional Programs by bringing its animals to the school and working with the students who have varying special needs.